Facebook Twitter Gplus LinkedIn RSS
formats

What it takes to be a Game Designer

Published on May 22, 2013, by in Game Design.

Perfect! They really nailed it, I don’t think I could explain it any better.

formats

Don’t Starve: Best Healing tips and tricks

Published on May 13, 2013, by in Games.

If you are new to Don’t Starve you probably want to start off with my tips for beginners.

If you are here and still reading you have figured out how to forage enough food to get by, but you still have problems surviving because you need to learn how to heal. Unlike other survival games you don’t just heal up over time, or rest outside of combat. Sleep seems like it would be the natural way to heal, but don’t waste resources on tents or bedrolls because it won’t work. Sleeping in DS is only to heal your Psyche and costs you food (you wake up very hungry so don’t sleep if you don’t have food already!)  There’s basically 4 ways to heal in DS

  1. Crafting Healing items
  2. Eat Flowers and Butterflies
  3. Eat cooked/dried foods
  4. Eat spider glands (recent update)

(more…)

formats

Creating a Game Design Document by Brenda Brathwaite

Published on May 9, 2013, by in Game Design.

Her article is 5 years old now but is still holds great advice and teachings on how to write a good game design document.

“Before you start writing, consider is your audience. Many new designers write documents as if they’re being written for gamers instead of a programmer who’s tired, annoyed and up at 3 a.m. coding your combat system. The latter is your audience. Statements like, “Cannons allow you to blast your enemies to pieces!” shouldn’t be in design documents. Save that for the back of the box. Try something like this instead: “Each cannon has four shots before it must be reloaded. Cannons are reloaded automatically, provided there is ammo available and a pirate is available to reload it. If no ammo is available…”

(more…)

formats

Google GLASS will be the next big thing

Published on May 8, 2013, by in Personal.

I don’t know if I’m an “early adopter” or “evangelist” for most gizmos and gadgets. But I have been a preacher for GLASS from the very first commercial. What astonishes me is how many Techies I know don’t give a hoot. Programmers and web designers who wet their shorts over their own programs and websites barely give it any credit at all. They expect it to flop.

 

This article is from  a person who has used his GLASS for only 2 weeks and vindicates my belief that GLASS will be the “next big thing“.

https://plus.google.com/+Scobleizer/posts/ZLV9GdmkRzS

 

A buddy asked me if I believed in it enough to invest in it. I don’t see how that’s directly possible. Either you would be investing in Google stock (I hate stock, no control) developing apps for the Google GLASS (too early in my opinion) or a retail outlet (yuck). It’s also tech. Investing in tech has too much fun attached to it, it’s too volatile and should be avoided unless you are investing in your own company (or mine wink wink). Investing shouldn’t be fun, it shouldn’t include being exciting about new products that’s not investing that’s gambling. Which is fine to do if 10% of capital is 100k or more per year. If not stick to the boring stuff we use everyday with low competition, patents or monopolies…like Gillette razors. See shaving razors, good, clean and terribly boring. That’s what Buffet bought during the tech boom, not tech stocks.

formats

Video Tutorial: How To Make The Best Game Design Document (GDD)

Published on May 3, 2013, by in Game Design, Tutorial.

 

Having a well written, detailed and structured Game Design Document (GDD) is important for any game project. This will help you collaborate better with your team and ultimately make better games. So now I am going to show you the way I make a GDD from the very beginning so it stays structured, quick and easy to navigate.

Whether you have never made a GDD before or make them often you will learn lots of neat tricks in my videos, that will make your GDD easier and more useful for you and your team!

“A GDD is not a piece of artwork. It’s purpose is to clearly communicate your vision to others. If you are the only one who clearly understands the GDD, it is not a GDD, it’s just a journal.” – Bud Leiser

 

 

formats

This comic hits the nail on the head don’t you think?

Published on May 1, 2013, by in Game Design, Personal.

Just replace the words “artist” with “Game Designer”

Nice one Lauren!

formats

Video Tutorial: How to come up with game ideas www.budleiser.com

Published on April 30, 2013, by in Game Design, Tutorial.

Free Game Designer Tutorials at www.budleiser.com

Coming up with new features, mechanics and ideas for games can be fun and rewarding. Watch this tutorial to learn the 5 key ways to come up with new ideas for your games.

formats

New Tutorial – Game Designer Tools: SWOT Test

Published on April 30, 2013, by in Game Design, Tutorial.

Learn what a SWOT test is and how to use it when designing games and features.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEZhfn5hidk

formats

How to make a GDD Part 1

Published on April 30, 2013, by in Game Design.

Having a well written, detailed and structured Game Design Document (GDD) is important for any game project. This will help you collaborate better with your team and ultimately make better games. So now I am going to show you the way I make a GDD from the very beginning so it stays structured and easy to navigate.

Whether you have never made a GDD before or make them often you will learn lots of neat tricks in my videos, that will make your GDD easier and more useful for you and your team!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1cmJEURlTg

formats

Brenda Brathwaite – Games for a Change

Published on April 30, 2013, by in Game Design.

I love TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) talks. This video shows that a “simple game” can be a more powerful learning experience for difficult subjects (Such as middle passage, holocaust) than a month of school, reading, assignments, and videos.

If you want people to truly “understand” something it needs a simulation. The military trains pilots on simulators, not books and videos alone. Games are still considered a form of childish entertainment and not the next big thing in education. Someday people will look back and go “Ohyea games, it’s obvious those are much better teaching tools how could anyone not have seen that?”

http://youtu.be/y9Z-3mz3j6U

%d bloggers like this: